Miami Open
welcome

Novak Djokovic’s visa has revoked been for the second time in a row over his right to remain in the country unvaccinated by Australia.

read on

As a result of the decision based on “health and good order,” he could be deported and face a three-year visa ban.

Djokovic’s lawyers have described the decision as “patently irrational,” and they intend to appeal.

The men’s tennis world number one is set to compete in the Australian Open, which begins on Monday.

“I exercised my power today… to cancel Mr. Novak Djokovic’s visa on health and good order grounds, on the basis that it was in the public interest to do so,” Immigration Minister Alex Hawke said in a statement.

The decision was made after “careful consideration,” according to Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

“Australians have made many sacrifices during this pandemic, and they rightly expect the outcome of those sacrifices to be protected,” Mr. Morrison said, referring to his government’s harsh criticism for allowing the unvaccinated player into the country.

Djokovic will meet with immigration officials in Melbourne on Saturday morning and will be permitted to remain in his current residence until Friday night.

Government lawyers stated during a legal hearing held shortly after the decision was announced that he would not be deported until his appeal was resolved.

The nine-time Australian Open champion hopes to defend his title next week, and if he does, he will be the most successful male tennis player in history, with a record 21 Grand Slam titles.

Djokovic is still in the Australian Open draw, where he will face fellow Serb Miomir Kecmanovic early next week.

If he is deported, Russian player Andrey Rublev will most likely take his place. Djokovic’s visa was revoked for the first time on January 6, shortly after his arrival in Melbourne, after Australian border Force officials said he “failed to provide appropriate evidence” to receive a vaccine exemption.

Because it was unclear whether he would be able to meet the country’s strict entry rules, his initial announcement that he would be playing in the Open sparked a backlash from some Australians, who have been living under long and strict Covid lockdowns.

Last year, lockdowns were particularly severe in Melbourne, with residents subjected to severe restrictions for 262 days.

Djokovic was detained for hours at the airport’s immigration control and then spent days at an immigration hotel when he first arrived.

A judge reinstated his visa and ordered his release a few days later, ruling that border officials had violated proper procedure when he arrived.

Mr. Hawke, on the other hand, revoked Djokovic’s visa on Friday evening in Melbourne, citing separate powers under Australia’s Migration Act.

The act gives him the authority to deport anyone he believes is a threat to “the health, safety, or good order of the Australian community,” but Djokovic can still appeal.

It comes after Djokovic addressed allegations that his agent inadvertently completed a false travel form on his behalf.

Djokovic admitted to meeting with a journalist and having a photoshoot after testing positive for Covid-19.

Novak Djokovic’s visa has revoked been for the second time in a row over his right to remain in the country unvaccinated by Australia.

As a result of the decision based on “health and good order,” he could be deported and face a three-year visa ban.

Djokovic’s lawyers have described the decision as “patently irrational,” and they intend to appeal.

The men’s tennis world number one is set to compete in the Australian Open, which begins on Monday.

“I exercised my power today… to cancel Mr Novak Djokovic’s visa on health and good order grounds, on the basis that it was in the public interest to do so,” Immigration Minister Alex Hawke said in a statement.

The decision was made after “careful consideration,” according to Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

“Australians have made many sacrifices during this pandemic, and they rightly expect the outcome of those sacrifices to be protected,” Mr. Morrison said, referring to his government’s harsh criticism for allowing the unvaccinated player into the country.

Djokovic will meet with immigration officials in Melbourne on Saturday morning and will be permitted to remain in his current residence until Friday night  Government lawyers stated during a legal hearing held shortly after the decision was announced that he would not be deported until his appeal was resolved.

The nine-time Australian Open champion hopes to defend his title next week, and if he does, he will be the most successful male tennis player in history, with a record 21 Grand Slam titles.

Djokovic is still in the Australian Open draw, where he will face fellow Serb Miomir Kecmanovic early next week.

If he is deported, Russian player Andrey Rublev will most likely take his place. Djokovic’s visa was revoked for the first time on January 6, shortly after his arrival in Melbourne, after Australian border Force officials said he “failed to provide appropriate evidence” to receive a vaccine exemption.

Because it was unclear whether he would be able to meet the country’s strict entry rules, his initial announcement that he would be playing in the Open sparked a backlash from some Australians, who have been living under long and strict Covid lockdowns.

Last year, lockdowns were particularly severe in Melbourne, with residents subjected to severe restrictions for 262 days.

Djokovic was detained for hours at the airport’s immigration control and then spent days at the immigration hotel when he first arrived.

A judge reinstated his visa and ordered his release a few days later, ruling that border officials had violated proper procedure when he arrived.

Mr. Hawke, on the other hand, revoked Djokovic’s visa on Friday evening in Melbourne, citing separate powers under Australia’s Migration Act.

The act gives him the authority to deport anyone he believes is a threat to “the health, safety, or good order of the Australian community,” but Djokovic can still appeal.

It comes after Djokovic addressed allegations that his agent inadvertently completed a false travel form on his behalf.

Djokovic admitted to meeting with a journalist and having a photoshoot after testing positive for Covid-19.

Novak Djokovic’s visa has been revoked bee for the second time in a row over his right to remain in the country unvaccinated by Australia.

As a result of the decision based on “health and good order,” he could be deported and face a three-year visa ban.

Djokovic’s lawyers have described the decision as “patently irrational,” and they intend to appeal.

Also read: Djokovic’s Australian Visa Application Saga Damaging – ATP

The men’s tennis world number one is set to compete in the Australian Open, which begins on Monday.

“I exercised my power today… to cancel Mr. Novak Djokovic’s visa on health and good order grounds, on the basis that it was in the public interest to do so,” Immigration Minister Alex Hawke said in a statement.

The decision was made after “careful consideration,” according to Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

“Australians have made many sacrifices during this pandemic, and they rightly expect the outcome of those sacrifices to be protected,” Mr Morrison said, referring to his government’s harsh criticism for allowing the unvaccinated player into the country.

Djokovic will meet with immigration officials in Melbourne on Saturday morning and will be permitted to remain in his current residence until Friday night.

Government lawyers stated during a legal hearing held shortly after the decision was announced that he would not be deported until his appeal was resolved.

The nine-time Australian Open champion hopes to defend his title next week, and if he does, he will be the most successful male tennis player in history, with a record 21 Grand Slam titles.

Djokovic is still in the Australian Open draw, where he will face fellow Serb Miomir Kecmanovvic early next week.

If he is deported, Russian player Andrey Rublev will most likely take his place. Djokovic’s visa was revoked for the first time on January 6, shortly after his arrival in Melbourne, after Australian border Force officials said he “failed to provide appropriate evidence” to receive a vaccine exemption.

Because it was unclear whether he would be able to meet the country’s strict entry rules, his initial announcement that he would be playing in the Open sparked a backlash from some Australians, who have been living under long and strict Covid lockdowns.

Last year, lockdowns were particularly severe in Melbourne, with residents subjected to severe restrictions for 262 days.

Djokovic was detained for hours at the airport’s immigration control and then spent days at an immigration hotel when he first arrived.

A judge reinstated his visa and ordered his release a few days later, ruling that border officials had violated proper procedure when he arrived.

Mr. Hawke, on the other hand, revoked Djokovic’s visa on Friday evening in Melbourne, citing separate powers under Australia’s Migration Act.

The act gives him the authority to deport anyone he believes is a threat to “the health, safety, or good order of the Australian community,” but Djokovic can still appeal.

It comes after Djokovic addressed allegations that his agent inadvertently completed a false travel form on his behalf.

Djokovic admitted to meeting with a journalist and having a photoshoot after testing positive for Covid-19.

 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here